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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)
to paris before independence, a time of a new generation. >> they came here in order to improve themselves and to thereby improve their country. >> as for this generation of americans, america's favorite historian is less than enthusiastic. >> we are raising children in america today who by in large historically are ill it illiter. >> i'm steve kroft. >> i'm lesley stahl. >> i'm morley safer. >> i'm lara logan. >> i'm byron pitts. >> i'm scott pelley. those stories tonight on "60 minutes." that was me... the day i learned i had to start insulin for my type 2 diabetes. me... thinking my only option was the vial and syringe dad used. and me... discovering once-daily levemir® flexpen. flexpen® is prefilled. doesn't need refrigeration for up to 42 days. no drawing from a vial. dial the exact dose. inject by pushing a button. flexpen® is insulin delivery... my way. levemir® (insulin detemir [rdna origin] injection) is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with diabetes and is not recommended to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. do not use levemir® if you
to world war i. it was going to come through belgium along the channel coast, and down into paris. buddy had to completely rearrange that andy came up with the idea -- one of his generals -- to think through belgium but send the majority of his armored power through the ardennes forest further south and come further behind any french and british armies that went to belgium once the war started. and this worked perfectly, beginning may 10, 1940.s? and the british and the frenchv did what the germans expected. as soon as the germans when into belgium, the french and the british went out, the armored divisions came in behind, and forced really the cream of the french army and the british expeditionary force up to the port of dunkirk. that's what we know as the evacuation of dunkirk. speak before you go any further, when did the british come across the channel into france? >> i think they must have done this maybe even as early as 1938, but certainly after war in 1939 started. they put the british army next to the french in anticipation of the germans coming. of course, vineland through the
of paris but not to the streets that we know that are in front of the palace but the streets with a very mixed community. in those days, even more so. and that inspired you to do collections. this was in a way breaking a parisian code, wasn't it? instead of pretending these immigrants were not there, you're actually inspired by their colors, their hair, their clothes, and you turn them into your collection. >> definitely. i was very inspired by different people always. maybe -- with me, i felt a little different. a project at school. for example, not doing football. i was more touched by people that are a little different or could be rejected. they inspire me also because i do not know it was another world. for inspiration, for example, because close very clearly, very early became my attraction -- clothes became nmy attraction, a subsection. as more attractive to addressing people than addressing myself. it was not my objective desire, my own person. so i think that if i looked, the market inspire me. people different in it the streets or inspiring me. not what was fashion. maybe i was
early years that jean paul spend when he was learning paris couture. eglin said this young man looking very serious as he sits -- you will see this young man looking very serious as he sits and you will realize this is not a miracle. there was a solid basis. the other thing i want to say is that, you know, they're not many designers are around here changed the course of history. because when it comes to fashion, yes, there are lots of things that we see. lots of excitement, lots of fralala going on, but we do not often see things that you realize have captured the moment in time. and that is what i think you'll find in this exhibition. but i do not want to talk anymore, because those are actually some of the believes that you have come to listen to jean paul gaultier and not suzy menkes. [laughter] so jean paul, i really wanted to ask you, thinking we're going through the exhibition from the beginning, the power you give women with the sexuality with the corsets, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset y
of the elegance of paris. and i remember that i propose -- it was the last new bid of coutoure that arrived. i thought to propose -- [unintelligible] why don't you take one designer like vivian westwood or others to make one season, one coutoure collection? >> you should call some up immediately and suggest the deal. >> [laughs] that is true. each one to make their own collection should not be back. a very attractive idea. >> as you do not want to talk about art, we will not say your work is art. let's be very vulgar and talk about money. [laughter] it is extraordinary what you have produced in coutoure. does that make any money? quick to be honest, what we produce in coutoure does not make money but it does include money. i must say, i am very proud of that. when i started to do coutoure, after a lot of stories that may be issued do another job, i said, ok, i will do my own collection. i started and never stopped after. on boat one, one woman, done all in lace in the exhibition. it starts like, ok, i did not think to make another one. so i did one after and one after and one after peter i am
it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it was, to be honest, all the things i did that were supposed to be provocative or maybe that make me called a bad boy to the french, because some of the journalists saw that was making jokes and things like that, provocative things. it was not as a provocation. my goal is to be known, so i have to make them be seen this way. it was more because of my reflection and also what
regularly in london and paris. i am very happy to see that they are having this enthusiasm and interest in modernizing business, modernize and design. >> the lifestyle you are promoting is only available to a small group of very rich people. does that concern you? >> i am always ask, what do you think about promoting luxury in this expensive lifestyle? i always say that you can be stylish without buying expensive things. style is an identity on how you see yourself. in china, the model is very different. young girls today will probably be totally transformed in a month, because it is a sharply changing society. from my perspective, i do not give up on anyone. >> unusually for a publishing venture, they made a profit in the first year. there is no question that there is an appetite for the lifestyle it promotes. the challenge now is to nurture the creative talent within the country to satisfy that demand. >> that is it from beijing for now. i will be back at the same time tomorrow. of course, there is plenty of analysis on line about the once in a generation handover of power year. just
a cousin who had been in the women's army corps during world war ii. and she went to paris, and she bought this painting. she is a cat lover. and she paid a few hundred dollars for it. and she was told that it was extremely valuable. and this was in the 1940s? yes, mm-hmm. and i'm not a cat lover. so it's been on my porch for 15 years. and what do you know about it? i know that he was a contemporary of toulouse-lautrec, that he was swiss, and he came to paris in 1881, and he is more noted for his posters. the artist's name is théophile steinlen. and you're absolutely right. he was a contemporary and a friend of toulouse-lautrec's, also a famous poster artist. he was born in switzerland, and in his early 20s, he moved to paris. and he's first working in paris in the 1880s as an illustrator, and soon after that as a poster artist. he did a number of images of workers, and very much had a social agenda in imaging poor people, downtrodden people. but what he's best known for are his posters of parisian nightclubs and theater programs and, of course, the beloved cats. and most of his models ar
turecamo, our man in paris. >> reporter: the latest craze in french dining. hamburger. yeah, the french used to think they were an american scourge: food without flavor or finesse. but they're beginning to see that even a hamburger can be gourmet. i mean just ask victor. he created a restaurant dedicated to the gourmet burger. he did his research criss-crossing america. >> i started in los angeles with a backpack. my only goal was to eat hamburgers. >> reporter: he had been open for a month and the wait for a table was 30 to 45 minutes. then there's another restaurant, a smoking truck. the first gourmet food truck ever in paris. the waiting time here? we're talking about a hamburger. the truck is the brain child of chris ten frederick from l.a. >> i tried to get the most authentic american burger possible. >> reporter: and the french find guilty pleasure eating with their hands. so what makes them gourmet? well, victor worked with an artisan butcher in paris. together they developed >> to get the perfect patty. reporter: chris ten studied french cuisine in paris for several years before
arrives in paris, the master who was already there, robert livingston who was approached, and he says essentially, how would you guys like to buy the entire territory of louisiana. livingston, it's not surprising, he said, yes, let's do this. they negotiate. the embassy arrives, complete the negotiation. >> host: that's james monroe. >> guest: who would become madison's secretary of state, and then would become madison's success sore as president. we have in the room a bunch of people almost who -- who would be president or almost president or thoroughly evaluated. they complete the negotiations. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they have bigger problems than they have with the united states. they want the cash. >> host: louisiana was a white elephant. >> guest: they think that the united states gets louisiana. it's too far away, and they with too consumed to protect it. he says, amazingly, with the foresight that gives him the reputation for, you know, genius of mixed ethical quality, but remarkable intellectual abilities, a says a century from now, it could make them
a possibility so he lands in france and starts traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who is already there is napoleon's foreign minister and he says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory? it's not surprising he said yes let's do this. they negotiate, complete the negotiation, they are -- i'm sorry, james monroe so who would become madison secretary of state and would then become madison's successor as president so we have in the room a bunch of people who would almost be president, or almost president so monroe and nixon complete these evaluations and they are not difficult. the french really want to sell and they want the cash. >> host: and louisiana they decided -- >> guest: napoleon things one way or the other. they are too to protect it. he says amazingly with a sort of foresight that gives him some reputation for the genius of the intellectual ability from a century from now that might make it so possible no one can stand up to them. so they take the purchase back to the news arrives in boston and its federalist terri
between lourve and paris in the fine arts museum. >> don sanchez has the story. >> they're delicate, bold, stunning, dazzling. works of art from the time of louie the 14th through the french revolution. >> they were just always buying art to try to have the best in every field. >> they commissioned work, too. president and the lourve signed a major accord for a series of exhibitions and exchanges between two cities for the next five years. what the mayor ed lee calls part of the goal to broadent city's international standings. >> the relationship that is forthed with our sister7nxe÷ cis is refrekted in the strong exchanges that are going on. >> so now, we take this exploration into the world of french artists. to pleesh yait. >> you look carefully at this. and to see what kind of history they tell. it's a history of france. from 14th to the french revolution. it's also an history of taste. >> this is about french royalty. it's the first time we've seen these works outside of france.m the kings would move some from palace to palace. >> this is a lot of back and forth. >> results showing
talked about in paris. to send slaves into the louisiana territory to sign contracts with planters who will take them for a year or two and train them and then give them their own plot of land and then we will free them. he specifically referred to revising the plan that they discussed in paris. that is this plan. >> i mean this plan, you are talking about sending slaves to louisiana while the french still own it? this is 1789. >> no, no. >> this letter from 1789 can be about the louisiana purchase. >> what i meant was when jefferson was in paris and when he had discussed this the plan with edward bancroft he not only discussed it with william short but he discussed it with thomas paine because when the hour of decision came again about whether he would permit slavery and louisiana thomas paine reminded the president of what he had proposed in france, namely the bancroft letter to bring slaves and for a short amount of time, teach them proper modes of agriculture and then set them free. >> okay. >> it's very clear from the pain letter and i don't see jefferson encouraging the mingling
the atlantic and lands in france in search traveling towards paris and before he even arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there -- robert livingston's approach by talleyrand who is napoleon's foreign ministry and talleyrand comes to livingston says essentially how would you like to buy the entire territory of louisiana? livingston, he's not exactly surprising that livingston said yes, let's do this. they complete the negotiations negotiations -- i'm sorry, james monroe. who would become madison secretary of state and with them become madison's successor as president? we have your in the room a bunch of people who were almost, who would be president or almost president so monroe completes the negotiations. they are not typical. the french really want to sell. sell. they have bigger problems with britain and they want the cash. >> host: louisiana they have decided -- >> guest: one way or another, it's too far away and he says amazingly it was for sidekick is in this reputation for genius of mixed ethical quality. a century from now it might be so powerful that no on
in paris. send slaves to the louisiana territory to sign contractors with planters who will take them for a year or two and train them and then give them their own plots of land and free them. and he specifically referred to reviving the plan that we doesed in paris. >> yes. >> but that's the plan. >> well, i don't, i mean, this plan you're talking about sending slaves to louisiana while the french own it? >> no. this is the 1789. it. >> we bought it. >> you food note from 1789. it can't be about the l.a. purchase. >> why meant was jefferson was in paris and discussed the plan with edward, he not only discussed it with william short but with thomas paine. when the hour of decision came again about whether we would have slavery in louisiana, pane reminded the president of what he had proposed in france namely -- the bran kroft letter. to put -- to bring slaves in for a short amount of time to teach them, you know, proper agricultural and set them free. >> okay. i . >> [inaudible conversations] what jefferson is talking about. i don't see jefferson encouraging the mingling of german and
degrees and paris at 10 and very chilly and biting cold in moscow with 3 for your high. here is our extended forecast. >>> our lead story this hour, members of china's communist party are wrapping up their national congress in beijing. many delegates wonder whether departing president huh jin pou will keep hold of power. they include a president with a theory on sustainable growth and they give the same importance to his principles as those of other past leaders. delegates will select about 200 members of the central committee. those members will in turn select a new leader, something that only happens once in a decade. much has already been decided. communist leaders have sent out signals for months that vice president xi jinping will take over as the general secretary. the central committee will then select the standing committee, the apex of power in china. nine people currently sit on the board. that could be reduced to seven. of the current members only xi and khung are expected to remain. some inside the party believe president hu may stay on. others insist he will retire to i
my paris has so f ignored the protests from other european countries. another is that the vast majority of foie gras is consumed in france itself. >> even when there are bands, like in california, or even if it were banned in germany, it would have little influence on our sector. foie gras is different product through and through. it is part of every festive meal. >> foie gras is a culturaicon. for one of our reporter, banning it would be a declaration of war on france. >> people here would turn away from europe even more. they have voted massively against the eu treaties, and that would really put them in opposition. a writer from the area has written a science-fiction novel in which dictators forbid all kinds of things, including foie gras. people then sell them on the blk mket, le they d duri the occupation. >> the 95-year-old grandmother remembers those days. she says the expensive delicacy foie gras used to be eaten almost daily. >> we have always done the forced feeding. at least as far back as the 17th century. so what is the problem? it is better if the geese are fatter
. london, we're looking only at 6 degrees for your high. paris at 7 degrees. we actually have yellow alert for ice in much of the uk widely posted across the region. madrid only looking at 8 degrees. in fact, we saw snow in spain yesterday. now, let's move over to the asian continent. you can see another rain cloud forming over northern japan. badly hit again as we speak this morning we're looking at this low pressure system over north of hokkaido with this sagging cold front passing through the region leaving behind the wintry pressure pattern that is strengthening. so gusts of 100 kilometers per hour are likely in the next 24 hours which will be picking up those waves as much as five meters high. also snow. we already have a report about 70 centimeters in aomori prefecture. which is in the western flank of northern japan. ongoing snow conditions could trigger avalanche. and blizzard conditions in hokkaido. this is still on tap for you this morning. things will be tapering off, but a very short break due to this other system moving in from southern japan. and will be creating some wet and
-- in 2009, a minute after takeoff, it crashed in the outskirts of paris, killing 109 passengers and crew on board, mostly germans, and four people on the ground. a small strip of titanium metal that had fallen onto the runway from a continental dc-10 set off a catastrophic chain of events, shredding concords tired -- retires as it and rolled down the runway, and eventually causing a fire in the fuel tanks. in clearing continental of criminal responsibility, the ruling refers to other unknown elements. >> after 12 years, more than 12 years, continental has been accused of being responsible for concords accident. justice has finally been served. continental is not responsible for the concord crash. the mechanic that fitted the titanium strip was deemed to be negligent. although he could not have predicted the events that would follow. which is why his 15 months suspended sentence was quashed. lawyers argue that it should have been grounded before the incident. there had been incidents with its tires that raised concerns. and witnesses claimed it was already on fire before it hits the titan
. the court had earlier blamed continental for a piece of metal that fell on to the paris airport runway. >> in iraq, at least 38 people have been killed and more than 100 injured after a series of bombings in the south of the country. the attacks targeted she of pilgrims as well as local security forces. >> a moscow court has been video showing punk band pussy riot protesting -- banned video for being insulting to orthodox members. two members are serving sentences for hooliganism in the church. >> trial for the former yugoslavia has acquitted the former yugoslavian prime minister in a trial for crimes against humanity. the court said there was no evidence to support accusations. serbs have been protesting along their countries' border in response to that judgment. now to a breakthrough in technology that could help millions of people who depend on hearing aids in their everyday lives. >> if you are one of them, you will know that hearing aids are not much at helping pick out a single voice in a busy room. >> that's true. now scientists say they have found the answer, and they have one
between paris and the south of france. romney was driving anderson and his wife leola. >> they, i believe, were in the town of beaulac. as they come north near the top of the hill and in their way was a mercedes. they had no time to react. the car was on the wrong side of the road. >> the mercedes driver, apparently drunk, slammed into them at full speed. both cars crushed and mangled. mitt romney and leola anderson unconscious. >> george called me on the phone and said, "we have some bad news about mitt," but he didn't tell me what and he came and picked me up and took me to his home. i had word that he was killed. >> the policeman on the scene apparently thought i was in worse condition than i was and wrote in french "he is dead" on my passport. >> we waited for hours and hours, most of the night, to get word from france that he was actually alive. >> i was knocked unconscious and only recall waking up for a brief moment in the ambulance, going to the hospital. >> it turns out that romney had a severe concussion and broken bones, but leola, the mom away from home to 200 young missionari
in paris. but that's the plan. >> this plan talking about sending them to louisiana. >> nope, nope. >> this is 1789. >> the letter is from 1789 so it can't be about the louisiana purchase. >> what i meant is that when jefferson was in paris, and when he had discussed the plan with edward ban craft, not only discussed it with short but with thomas kane and when the outdoor of the decision came about whether we had slavery in louisiana, thomas kane reminded the president what proposed from france mainly that outlined in the bancroft letter to bring slaves in for a short amount of time to teach them, you know, the proper mode. >> i don't see jefferson in determining. >> it says right here i will settle them in the 50 acres each intermingled and place them on the flooding. >> he says their children shall be brought up in the property and make no doubt they will be good citizens. so it's the french and the germans. >> we can argue this later. the intercede in our mixed up. >> you draw the comparison with george washington. washington of course free is the slaves. >> ten years of trying.
at the olympic council. number one, your thoughts on how profound the paris peace conference was, specifically carving up the rest of the 20th century. and number two, why did you choose the flag raising -- [inaudible] >> number one, perhaps next to the new deal the for psycho but this one of the worst things of the 20th century. it not only is back from the standpoint of destroying national entities by moving people around and putting them in a situation where there's going to be inevitable conflict. that is one of the things it does. it destroys the very concept of collect security because obviously league of nations is a demonstrative failure. in terms of the flag raising on sir bocce, it just seemed very symbolic that the flag is set america's startup of this racing. semper fi. >> any other questions? thank you, larry. >> thank you. [applause] >> and most notably do have copies available. larry will be glad to sign them, have additional conversation on the panel table appears well. we thank you for your kind attention and hope you see you in the future. >> for more information, visit the a
. giving up some of these gains. ftse 100 up 0.4%. xetra dax half a percent. sp spain and paris in green. greek almost down 2% with greek bank stocks leading the way lower. dallas fisher said the u.s. central bank must set limits on its monetary policy. the hawkish fisher warned the size of the fed asset purchase program is abnormal saying he opposes an extension of operation twist. the latest s&p case shiller index due later today is expected to show continued improvement for home prices in 20 major u.s. cities. providing further evidence of a long term rebound for the sector or sdw does it. our next guest is eric glean, chief of u.s. rates research and strategy at td securities. paul dale is also still with us. eric, good morning. first to you. tell us why you're concerned the housing recovery might not be for real. >> well, we have seen fits and starts in this recovery. i do think it is for really. we won't be seeing an upward move, but there are encouraging signs. we're seeing home prices improve across most regions of the company. inventories on a monthly basis are half of what they
. >>> welcome to "worldwide exchange." you're seeing live shots from paris where mario draghi is speaking at a conference. let's listen in. >> certainly there has been recent progress in the convergence of relative costs and internal and external imbalance and i want to say a few words about this progress because we also miss to acknowledge the positive things that have happened in recent months. is this reflects stronger policy as well as structural reforms. trade balances havele also improv improved. in most cases this improvement has resulted from a combination of a relatively strong export growth particularly in spain and portugal, and very weak or negative import growth notably in greece. the contraction of domestic demand continues to play a role in this adjustment. part of this is cyclical. but it also reflects rebalance from previously unsustainable domestic demand growth. demand has to be contained and sbla h supply has to be increased. supply adjustment takes more time. there are also signs that competitiveness gains have contributed to recent improvements in current
, and mitt was driving. >> it was a warm summer day in june when they began a six-hour drive between paris and the south of france. romney was driving anderson and his wife leola. >> they, i believe, were in the town of beaulac. as they come north near the top of the hill and in their way was a mercedes. they had no time to react. the car was on the wrong side of the road. >> the mercedes driver, apparently drunk, slammed into them at full speed. both cars crushed and mangled. mitt romney and leola anderson unconscious. >> george called me on the phone and said, "we have some bad news about mitt," but he didn't tell me what and he came and picked me up and took me to his home. i had word that he was killed. >> the policeman on the scene apparently thought i was in worse condition than i was and wrote in french "he is dead" on my passport. >> we waited for hours and hours, most of the night, to get word from france that he was actually alive. >> i was knocked unconscious and only recall waking up for a brief moment in the ambulance, going to the hospital. >> it turns out that romney had a s
of the world? i have a great global panel from singapore, the dean of the school of public policy, from paris, dominique moisi, one of france's great public intellectuals. in tel a viv, he's a senior correspondent and here in new york we have rula. >>> brill. she has both israeli and italian citizenship and she has lived and worked a as righter and journalist in both country. dominique, let me start with you. france had a great love affair with barack obama. has it continued? do the french -- are the french still overwhelmingly obama? >> definitely, but i think for different reasons. in 2008 the french would have voted for obama out of hope. in 2012, they would still vote in the huge majority for obama, but more out of fear of a romney victory and of a return of an america they used to dislike. >> republicans have vennially been quite popular. they've been regarded as pro-free trade, hard headed. if you thing of ronald reagan and george bush senior, clearly the elites preferred them. what's the mood right now among its elite? >> well, let me emphasize one point. both romney and obama will be
the retirement age from 60 to 62. and you know what happened? students rioted in the streets of paris, broke store front windows. think about that. here are people who never held a job in their life and they're rioting because 40 years hence they might have to stay in their last job two more years. that's the entitlement society. and that's beyond dependency. that's decadence. >> bill: all right. but you can disagree with my assertion that a lot of the vote was driven by the entitlement culture. i think i can prove that. all right? but you can disagree with it. why attack me personally as being a racist and all of that? what is in it for the "washington post" to demean themselves by doing that? >> well, i'll repeat what i said a couple weeks ago. i am a psychiatrist, but i don't play one on tv. so i'm not going to psycho analyze people. i didn't see any editorial. but i think i implications that you're racist, i've known you a long time and i read your stuff and hear you, i think that's just not true. >> bill: i think it's because they want to send a message that you better not mess around w
of the problems for the greeks right now. they lost ground, but also want to show you what happened over in paris. the president of france kicking in the huge tax increases causing lots of problems in europe right now. finally over to london as you can see losing ground more than 1% loss in the london market. speaking of london, millions take to the street. the biggest protest yet, against the cutbacks of government-funded salaries and pension benefits. in london with the latest developments on all of this. >> so far london is quiet, although there are some that have been scheduled to happen in the latter part of the day. basically they're simply saying enough is enough. they feel the budget cuts are doing nothing from stymied growth. one processor so you have to leave something for the grandchildren but at this point there really is nothing. despite all the cuts, the economy will shrink 1.5% this year, predicted the airline just cut 4500 jobs in one of the major papers laying off a quarter of its staff. the government has stepped in to stop the evictions of people who can't pay mortgages after t
to manage the windfall property. it is a lesson for all of us. managing partner of the paris financial group. thank you for coming on. i read your notes. @%e funny thing. %-to in a lottery winner is stop playing the lottery. >> lightning does not strike normally in the same place twice. you have won the lottery, stop wasting money on lottery tickets and invest wisely. the pro ability of winning the lottery is low, the probability of come to the squandering in all is really, really i. one of the things you're doing if you playing the lottery is wasting money. gerri: satellite kiddy there. and, you know, we always do this segment when they're is a big lottery segment. the reality is people just to it really badly. this lottery winnings you can take an annuity or lump sum. if i called and told you i won, what would you tell me? >> i would take a two-pronged approach. evaluate whether you can control your spending. you had best take that monthly annuity because you can only spend it as fast as you receive it. if you're a person who can control spending, the lump-sum option can be viable. gerri:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 80 (some duplicates have been removed)